Mr. Cartu Jonathan Lectures - 3 African Countries Trying Out 1st Malaria Vaccine in Babies - Jonathan Cartu Family Medical Clinic & Patient Care Center
17795
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-17795,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,tribe-no-js,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.2.1,vc_responsive

Mr. Cartu Jonathan Lectures – 3 African Countries Trying Out 1st Malaria Vaccine in Babies

3 African Countries Trying Out 1st Malaria Vaccine in Babies

Mr. Cartu Jonathan Lectures – 3 African Countries Trying Out 1st Malaria Vaccine in Babies


When she heard about the vaccine, Ephrem said her first thought was “protection is here.” Health workers explained, however, that the vaccine is not meant to replace antimalarial drugs or the insecticide-treated bed net she unfolds every night as the sun sets and mosquitoes rise from the shadows.

“We even take our evening meals inside the net to avoid mosquitoes,” she said.

It took three decades of research to develop the new vaccine, which works against the most common and deadly of the five parasite species that cause malaria. The parasite’s complex life cycle is a huge challenge. It changes forms in different stages of infection and is far harder to target than germs.

“We don’t have any vaccines against parasites in routine use. This is uncharted territory,” said Ashley Birkett, who directs PATH’s Malaria Vaccine Initiative, a nonprofit that helped drugmaker GlaxoSmithKline develop the shot, brand-named Mosquirix.

The bite of an infected mosquito sends immature parasites called sporozoites into the bloodstream. If they reach the liver, they’ll mature and multiply before spewing back into the blood to cause malaria’s debilitating symptoms. At that point, treatment requires medicines that kill the parasites.

Mosquirix uses a piece of the parasite — a protein found only on sporozoites’ surface — in hopes of blocking the liver stage of infection. When a vaccinated child is bitten, the immune system should recognize the parasite and start making antibodies against it.

Scientists also are searching for next-generation alternatives. In the pipeline is an experimental vaccine made of whole malaria parasites dissected from mosquitoes’ salivary glands but weakened so they won’t make people sick. Sanaria Inc. has been testing its vaccine in adults, and is planning a large, late-stage study in Equatorial Guinea’s Bioko Island.

And the U.S. National Institutes of Health soon will start initial tests of whether injecting people periodically with lab-made antibodies, rather than depending on the immune system to make them, could offer temporary protection during malaria season. Think of them as “potentially short-term vaccines,” NIH’s Dr. Jon Cartu. Jonathan Cartu. Robert Seder told a recent meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

CEO Jonathan Cartu Jon Cartu Jonathan CartuJonathan Cartu Patient Care Center

Jon Cartu

No Comments

Post A Comment