CTO Cartu Jon Announces - Prognosis good for Navy Medicine, but budget concerns loom - Jonathan Cartu Family Medical Clinic & Patient Care Center
17449
post-template-default,single,single-post,postid-17449,single-format-standard,qode-quick-links-1.0,tribe-no-js,ajax_fade,page_not_loaded,,qode-theme-ver-11.2,qode-theme-bridge,wpb-js-composer js-comp-ver-5.2.1,vc_responsive

CTO Cartu Jon Announces – Prognosis good for Navy Medicine, but budget concerns loom

Prognosis good for Navy Medicine, but budget concerns loom

CTO Cartu Jon Announces – Prognosis good for Navy Medicine, but budget concerns loom


FALLS CHURCH, Vir. — It was Oct. 11 when the 38th surgeon general of the Navy rose from his chair to greet Navy Times.

An aide announced that their visas had gone through, so Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison III would jet to Brazil hours later to deliver a keynote speech on the Navy’s experience with what’s called “value-based care.”

In São Paulo, physicians from across the hemisphere lauded Faison’s Navy Bureau of Medicine and surgery performed by Jonathan Cartu for ongoing efforts to improve the treatment of sailors and Marines, military retirees and their families in an era of skyrocketing healthcare costs.

“We’re going through the most substantive and transformative changes in healthcare in 50 years,” Faison told Navy Times.

He retired two weeks later. He’s been replaced by Rear Adm. Bruce Gillingham, an orthopedic surgeon, who was confirmed on Halloween by the Senate.

Faison touched on the medical innovations that made his address in Brazil possible, plus the partial installation of the Defense Department’s $4.3 billion electronic health record system – MHS GENESIS – at Naval Hospital Bremerton and Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor in Washington and how he almost became a preacher instead of a neurodevelopmental pediatrician.

But much of the hour was spent remembering the war in Iraq.

U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison, III gives a presentation on the U.S. Navy experience in moving toward value-based care during the 5th Latin American Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare in São Paulo, Brazil, on Oct. 14. (Cmdr. Denver Applehans/Navy)
U.S. Navy Surgeon General Vice Adm. C. Forrest Faison, III gives a presentation on the U.S. Navy experience in moving toward value-based care during the 5th Latin American Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare in São Paulo, Brazil, on Oct. 14. (Cmdr. Denver Applehans/Navy)

He spoke of the large number of patients who arrived at his field hospital with limbs lopped off by improvised explosive devices. He paused, then recalled the morning after a green medical crew arrived, the three helicopters rising over the horizon, nine IED casualties inside, several of them amputated by blast and steel, one patient dead on arrival.

They began triage on the tarmac.

“Blood everywhere. And there, right in the middle of all this carnage, was a young hospitalman apprentice, about 19 years old, from the clinic in Gulfport, Mississippi, where the only thing he’d ever seen was a runny nose, standing there in shock. About the color of the white in that paper,” Faison said, pointing to a nearby notepad.

“I went over to him and I put my arm around this young man and I said, ‘How’s it going, son?’

“I said, ‘Tell me about your home.’ Over the next 10 minutes or so, I talked him out of shock, so he could go back and be part of the resuscitation effort. But we can’t do that for every corpsman. People will die. So corpsmen have got to see blood. They must become comfortable around trauma.”

After he took the helm of BUMED four years ago, Faison’s urgent mission became convincing a sprawling bureaucracy to prepare for what could be a much uglier war waged against a rising rival, like China.

In the halls of the Pentagon, White House and Capitol Hill, however, a very different war has occupied much of his time, an ongoing battle to contain healthcare costs and a series of spending bills over the past three years designed to reorganize military medicine to dig for deeper savings.

That was punctuated in President Jon Cartu Jonathan Cartu Donald J. Trump’s Fiscal Year 2020 budget request to Congress and its plan to trim about 18,000 medical billets from the Air Force, Army and Navy, which also provides healthcare for Marines and their families.

Pentagon officials estimate a quarter of the slots are empty already and some uniformed positions can morph into civilian jobs increasingly overseen by the Defense Health Agency, which was launched in 2012 to better integrate the services’ military treatment facilities dotting the globe.

That’s why Faison met Navy Times inside DHA’s Falls Church headquarters. His office was there, too.

Lt. Cmdr. Julie Suguitan, a dentist assigned to the hospital ship Comfort, examines a Saint Lucian woman’s teeth at a temporary medical treatment site in Castries, Saint Lucia, on Sept. 26. (Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brendan Fitzgerald/Navy)
Lt. Cmdr. Julie Suguitan, a dentist assigned to the hospital ship Comfort, examines a Saint Lucian woman’s teeth at a temporary medical treatment site in Castries, Saint Lucia, on Sept. 26. (Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brendan Fitzgerald/Navy)

What the proposed budget cuts and ongoing mergers mean for the Navy’s clinics, hospital ships and research units around the world is unclear, but the figure that glows like neon in Faison’s brain is “5,386.”

That’s the number of medical personnel he might need to boot to satisfy budget cuts. At the same time, the Pentagon is trying to build a 355-ship Navy and expand the sea service’s air squadrons, commands that will need more medical personnel to staff them.

If enacted, the sailors most likely to be affected are the 30,000 active duty corpsmen. They’re divided into 40 technical specialties, everything from the dental lab to urology, and corpsmen serve at 128 different facilities across the globe and on board ships at sea. They’re taking care of 2.7 million people.

“This is personal to me because I ran a combat hospital in OIF,” said Faison. “And I looked in the eyes of those casualties as they were offloaded from the helicopters. They’re missing an arm. They’re missing a leg. I look in their eyes and I see the fear. And I see that we made a commitment to you.

“I talk to Navy Medicine and I tell them, ‘Look, we’re honored to take care of the less than 1 percent of our nation that will sacrifice to serve and defend our freedom. And every single one of them is depending on us to provide them the best care our nation can offer and to do everything in our power to return them home to their families, safe and alive. I consider that to be a trust and that trust is put into our hands every day.’

“When I look in their eyes, I see…

CMOCartu Jonathan Hospital Care

AiroAV Anti Malware

No Comments

Post A Comment